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ABOUT US

Mission
We are a non for profit organization who’s aim is to raise funds to build and financially support a sustainable community based childcare centre.

The Centre’s aim will be to help in the early identification of children affected by HIV/AIDS.

By setting up committees/groups of volunteers from the community and working closely with the schools and churches the centre’s aim is to meet both the short and long term needs of these children whether physical, emotional, social economic or spiritual.

Vision
It takes a community to raise a child.

The Situation
South Africa is facing a problem, the enormity of which is difficult to comprehend. Poverty compounded by HIV/AIDS is leaving many, many children orphaned.

3 Categories of children with special needs

  • Children whose parents are ill
  • Children whose parents have died
  • Children with HIV and AIDS

Our organization evolved out of the need for a centre that can help both in the identification of these children and meet their immediate and long term needs.

History
A large percentage of South Africa’s population lives with and faces the very real issues of poverty daily.

A lot of pain and suffering comes with poverty. Those living in poverty are subjected to mental and physical stress. Hopelessness, drug abuse, physical abuse, homelessness, increased violence, are all merely some of the effects that poverty may have caused within a community.

In lacking essential health and social services, they are subjected to the stress of being deprived of food, clothing, shelter and safe drinking water. There is also the “unseen” things that determine “existing” from “living”- like respect from fellow citizens with the negative the stigma HIV/AIDS still has. These things all determine the quality of life.

Statistics
Between the unemployment rate (+- 24%) and the ever-increasing number of deaths due to HIV/AIDS (+_ 900 per day), up to 2 000 000 children have been affected by the illness in some way or another and an estimated 300 000 under the age of 15.